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St. James the Less


Name: St. James the Less
Date: 11 May

Philip was one of the first chosen disciples of Christ. On the way from Judea to GalileeOur Lord found Philip, and said, “Follow Me.” Philip straightway obeyed; and then inhis zeal and charity sought to win Nathaniel also, saying, “We have found Him of whomMoses and the prophets wrote, Jesus of Nazareth.” And when Nathaniel in wonderasked, “Can any good come out of Nazareth?” Philip simply answered, “Come and see,”and brought him to Jesus.

Another saying of this Apostle is preserved for us by Saint John. Christ in His lastdiscourse had spoken of His Father; and Philip exclaimed, in the fervor of his thirst forGod, “Lord, show us the Father, and it is enough!” The tradition of the ancients hasestablished that he died a martyr at Hierapolis in Phyrgia. There the remains of a churchknown to be dedicated to him have been identified, north of the entrance to the greatnecropolis. His relics were later transported to Rome, to the church of the Holy Apostles.

Saint James the Less (the Younger), author of the canonical Epistle, was the son ofAlpheus, the brother of Saint Jude and a cousin of Our Lord, whom he is said to haveresembled. Saint Paul tells us that he was favored by a special apparition of Christ afterthe Resurrection. (I Corinthians 15:7) On the dispersion of the Apostles among thenations, Saint James remained as Bishop of Jerusalem, where the Jews held in such highveneration his purity, mortification, and prayer, that they named him the Just. Hegoverned that church for 30 years before his martyrdom.

Hegesippus, the earliest of the Church’s historians, has handed down many traditions ofSaint James’s sanctity. Saint James was a celibate Nazarite consecrated to God; he drankno wine and wore no sandals. He prostrated himself so long and so often in prayer thatthe skin of his knees was hardened like a camel’s hoof. It is said that the Jews, out ofrespect, used to touch the hem of his garment. He was indeed a living proof of his ownwords, “The wisdom that is from above is first of all chaste, then peaceable, modest,ready to listen, full of mercy and good fruits.” (James 3:17) He sat beside Saint Peter andSaint Paul at the Council of Jerusalem. When Saint Paul at a later time escaped the furyof the Jews by appealing to Caesar, the people took vengeance on James, and crying out,“The just one has erred!” stoned him to death. During his martyrdom he prayed for hispersecutors in the same words pronounced by Jesus: “Heavenly Father, forgive them,they know not what they do.”


Sources: Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints, a compilation based on Butler’s Lives of the


St. Mammertus


Name: St. Mammertus
Date: 11 May

Saint Mammertus, Archbishop of Vienne in Dauphiné during the 5th century, was aprelate renowned for his sanctity, learning, and miracles. He instituted in his diocese thefasts and supplications called the Rogations, during the three days before the Ascension,to remedy the neglect of religion which brought down on ancient Gaul manychastisements.

Almighty God, to punish the sins of the people, had visited them with wars and otherpublic calamities and awakened the city of Vienne in particular from spiritual lethargy bythe terrors of earthquakes, fires, and ravenous wild beasts, which were sometimes seen inthe very market place. These evils were ascribed by the impious to blind chance, butreligious and prudent persons considered them as tokens of the divine anger, whichthreatened their entire destruction.

Amid these scourges, Saint Mammertus received a pledge of the divine mercy. A terriblefire broke out on Easter night in the city of Vienne, which baffled the efforts of men; butby the prayers of the good bishop the fire suddenly went out. This miracle stronglyaffected the minds of the people. It was on this occasion that the holy prelate conceivedthe project of restoring the Rogations, which had fallen into oblivion. The Church ofAuvergne, where Saint Sidonius Apollonarius was bishop of Clermont, also adopted thispious institution before the year 475, and in a very short time it became a universalpractice. His pious reform was received by all the churches of France after the firstCouncil of Orleans under Clovis the Great, and then by the Church of Rome under theauthority of Leo III.

Saint Mammertus died about the year 477 in Vienne, but his body was transported toOrleans and placed in its cathedral. There, until the 16th century, it remained in greatveneration, then was burnt by enemies of the Church.


Sources: Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints, a compilation based on Butler’s Lives of the


St. Philip, Apostle


Name: St. Philip, Apostle
Date: 11 May

Philip was one of the first chosen disciples of Christ. On the way from Judea to GalileeOur Lord found Philip, and said, “Follow Me.” Philip straightway obeyed; and then inhis zeal and charity sought to win Nathaniel also, saying, “We have found Him of whomMoses and the prophets wrote, Jesus of Nazareth.” And when Nathaniel in wonderasked, “Can any good come out of Nazareth?” Philip simply answered, “Come and see,”and brought him to Jesus.

Another saying of this Apostle is preserved for us by Saint John. Christ in His lastdiscourse had spoken of His Father; and Philip exclaimed, in the fervor of his thirst forGod, “Lord, show us the Father, and it is enough!” The tradition of the ancients hasestablished that he died a martyr at Hierapolis in Phyrgia. There the remains of a churchknown to be dedicated to him have been identified, north of the entrance to the greatnecropolis. His relics were later transported to Rome, to the church of the Holy Apostles.

Saint James the Less (the Younger), author of the canonical Epistle, was the son ofAlpheus, the brother of Saint Jude and a cousin of Our Lord, whom he is said to haveresembled. Saint Paul tells us that he was favored by a special apparition of Christ afterthe Resurrection. (I Corinthians 15:7) On the dispersion of the Apostles among thenations, Saint James remained as Bishop of Jerusalem, where the Jews held in such highveneration his purity, mortification, and prayer, that they named him the Just. Hegoverned that church for 30 years before his martyrdom.

Hegesippus, the earliest of the Church’s historians, has handed down many traditions ofSaint James’s sanctity. Saint James was a celibate Nazarite consecrated to God; he drankno wine and wore no sandals. He prostrated himself so long and so often in prayer thatthe skin of his knees was hardened like a camel’s hoof. It is said that the Jews, out ofrespect, used to touch the hem of his garment. He was indeed a living proof of his ownwords, “The wisdom that is from above is first of all chaste, then peaceable, modest,ready to listen, full of mercy and good fruits.” (James 3:17) He sat beside Saint Peter andSaint Paul at the Council of Jerusalem. When Saint Paul at a later time escaped the furyof the Jews by appealing to Caesar, the people took vengeance on James, and crying out,“The just one has erred!” stoned him to death. During his martyrdom he prayed for hispersecutors in the same words pronounced by Jesus: “Heavenly Father, forgive them,they know not what they do.”


Sources: Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints, a compilation based on Butler’s Lives of the


St. Epiphanius


Name: St. Epiphanius
Date: 12 May

Saint Epiphanius was born about the year 315, of Israelite parents, in Palestine. He losthis father while very young, and was raised by a wealthy man who later made him hisheir when he died. In his youth he began the study of Holy Scripture, and became aChristian in circumstances which remain unknown. With his sister he received Baptism;and then, leaving a part of his inheritance to her, he sold the rest, gave the money to poor,and kept only what he needed to buy books for his studies. He knew several languages,and could read Scripture in all its texts.

With a desire for perfection, he visited the solitaries of Egypt, and when formed formonastic life, returned in 333 to his homeland. He was ordained a priest and founded amonastery in his native region of Eleutheropolis, which he governed for long years asAbbot. His labors in the exercise of virtue seemed to some to surpass his strength; but hisapology was always: “God gives the kingdom of heaven only on condition that we labor;and all we can do bears no proportion to such a crown.” He sometimes relaxed hispersonal austerities in favor of hospitality, preferring charity to abstinence. To his prayerand corporal austerities he added an indefatigable application to study. Most booksextant at that time passed through his hands. Although he was himself the skillfuldirector of many others, Saint Epiphanius chose the great Saint Hilarion of Palestine ashis master in the spiritual life, and benefitted from his direction and acquaintance for overtwenty years.

A prophecy made to him in Egypt, that one day he would be bishop of Cyprus, alarmedhim; and to avoid that honor, which he regarded as a misfortune, he decided to goelsewhere. The ship on which he embarked, however, landed by a contrary wind onCyprus, where the bishops were assembled to choose a successor to the deceased bishopof Salamine, its capital. He was elected in 367 by a disposition of Providence whosedetails are unknown. He continued to wear the monastic habit and to govern hismonastery in Palestine, which he visited from time to time. No one surpassed him intenderness and charity to the poor.

The veneration which all men had for his sanctity exempted him from the persecution ofthe Arian Emperor Valens in 371. In 382 he journeyed to Rome, for a council convokedby Pope Saint Damasus. In the year 403, when he was on his way back to Salamis afteran absence in Constantinople, he was taken ill and died during the voyage, having beenbishop thirty-six years. He was greatly admired and praised by his contemporaries, andhis Cypriote disciples built a church dedicated to him.


Sources: Les Petits Bollandistes: Vies des Saints, by Msgr. Paul Guérin (Bloud et Barral:


St. Imelda Lambertini


Name: St. Imelda Lambertini
Date: 12 May

Saint Imelda was born at Bologna in Italy, in the early 14th century. Still a child, shearranged a little oratory in her house, where she often would pray. She resolved to entera monastery and make the vows of religion, and to give herself entirely to her Saviour. Her parents permitted her entry into a Dominican convent at Valdipietra, near Bologna. She practiced mortifications above her age, and manifested a very tender love for theQueen of Angels and the Holy Eucharist, though she could not yet receive HolyCommunion. But God was soon to manifest that it is not age which wins His favor, butvirtue.

On the day of the Ascension in 1333, when Imelda was twelve years old, she aloneremained unable to advance to receive Holy Communion. She raised her eyes to heavenand prayed to her Lord: “Come, for I am languishing with love and dying with desire forYour adorable presence!” When He did not come, she continued to pray and weep. Suddenly, a miraculous Host came forth from the tabernacle, crossed the grill separatingthe choir, and stopped in the air before her. The nuns, amazed, hardly dared raise theireyes, but soon they realized there was no illusion: the miracle continued, a suddenbrightness and a sweet fragrance filled the church, while an invisible hand continued tohold the mystical Bread in the air before the young girl. She herself seemed an Angel inadoration. Her confessor was told to come, and saw all that the Sisters were seeing. Heplaced the Sacred Host on a paten, and then gave it to the child. She seemed to loseconsciousness. But soon the Sisters grew anxious; they called her by name, told her torise, touched her, but Saint Imelda was no longer of this world; she had expired in anecstasy of pure love.


Sources: Les Petits Bollandistes: Vies des Saints, by Msgr. Paul Guérin (Bloud et Barral:


Other Highlights
»The Eternal Father
»The Circumcision of Our Lord
»St. William Berruyer
»St. Theodosius
»St. Alfred or Aelred
»St. Margaret Bourgeois
»St. Veronica of Milan
»The Baptism of Our Lord
»St. Hilary of Poitiers
»St. Paul the First Hermit
»St. Honoratus
»St. Marcellus, Pope
»Blessed Stephanie Quinzani
»St. Anthony Abbott
»St. Peters' Chair at Rome
»St. Canutus
»St. Fulgentius
»St. Macarius
»St. Fabien
»St. Sebastian
»St. Agnes
»St. Vincent, martyr
»St. Raymond of Pennafort
»St. Timothy
»St. Paul, The Conversion of
»St. Polycarp
»St. John Chrysostom
»St. Peter Nolasco
»St. Francis de Sales
»St. Genevieve
»St. Martina
»St. John Bosco
»St. Gregory, Bishop of Langres
»St. Angela of Foligno
»St. Simeon Stylites
»The Epiphany of Our Lord
»St. Lucian
»St. Claude Apollinaire
»St. Julian the Hospitalarian
»St. Basilissa
»St. Remi or Remigius
»St. Francis Borgia
»St. Tarachus
»The Divine Maternity of Mary
»St. Wilfrid
»Bl. Jane Leber
»St. Edward
»St. Callistus I
»St. Teresa of Avila
»St. Gall

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